"In order that the mind may not be taxed, moreover, by the manifold and confused reading of so many such things, and in order to prevent the escape of something valuable that we have read, heard, or discovered through the process of thinking itself, it will be found very useful to entrust to notebooks ... those things which seem noteworthy and striking."

[Commonplace books: Thomas Farnaby, 17th-century]

I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by, And the wheel's kick, and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking, And a gray mist on the sea's face, and a grey dawn breaking. I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call which may not be denied. And all I ask is a windy day with white clouds flying, And flung spray and blown spume, and the seagulls crying. I must down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, To the gull's way, and the whale's way, where the wind's like a whetted knife. And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow rover, And a quite sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over.

[sailing, sea: John Masefield [1878-1967], Sea Fever]

Posted by rebeccap on 08.17.2009

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